Date Archives: August 2022

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Buying | 29 Posts
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August
22

If rising home prices leave you wondering if it makes more sense to rent or buy a home in today's housing market, consider this. It's not just home prices that have risen in recent years – rental prices have skyrocketed as well. As a recent article from realtor.com says:

"The median rent across the 50 largest US metropolitan areas reached $1,876 in June, a new record level for Realtor.com data for the 16th consecutive month."

That means rising prices will likely impact your housing plans either way. But there are a few key differences that could make buying a home a more worthwhile option for you.

If You Need More Space, Buying a Home May Be More Affordable

What you may not realize is that, according to the latest data from realtor.com and the National Association of Realtors (NAR), it may actually be more affordable to buy than rent, depending on how many bedrooms you need. The graph below uses the median rental payment and median mortgage payment across the country to show why.

As the graph conveys, if you need two or more bedrooms, it may actually be more affordable to buy a home even as prices rise. While this doesn't take into consideration the interest deduction or other financial advantages that come with owning a home, it does help paint the picture that it may be more affordable to buy than rent for that unit size based on nationwide averages. So, if one of the factors motivating you to move is a desire for more space, this could be the added encouragement you need to consider homeownership.

Homeownership Also Provides Stability and a Chance To Grow Your Wealth

In addition to being more affordable depending on how many bedrooms you need, buying has two other key benefits: payment stability and equity.

When you buy a home, you lock in your monthly payment with your fixed-rate mortgage. And that's especially important in today's inflationary economy. With inflation, prices rise across the board for things like gas, groceries, and more. Locking in your housing payment, which is likely your largest monthly expense, can provide greater long-term stability and help shield you from those rising expenses moving forward. Renting doesn't provide that same predictability. A recent article from CNET explains it like this:

"…if you buy a house and secure a fixed-rate mortgage, that means that no matter how much prices or interest rates go up, your fixed payment will stay the same every month. That's an advantage over renting since there's a good chance your landlord will raise your rent to counter inflationary pressures." 

Not to mention, when you buy, you have the chance to build equity, which in turn grows your net worth. It works like this. As you pay down your home loan over time and as home values continue to appreciate, so does your equity. And that equity can make it easier to fuel a move into a future home if you decide you need a bigger home later on. Again, the CNET article mentioned above helps explain:

"Homeownership is still considered one of the most reliable ways to build wealth. When you make monthly mortgage payments, you're building equity in your home that you can tap into later on. When you rent, you aren't investing in your financial future the same way you are when you're paying off a mortgage."

If you're trying to decide whether to keep renting or buy a home, let's connect to explore your options. With home equity and a shield against inflation on the line, it may make more sense to buy a home if you're able to.

 

August
16

If you're following the news, chances are you've seen or heard some headlines about the housing market that don't give the full picture. The real estate market is shifting, and when that happens, it can be hard to separate fact from fiction. That's where a trusted real estate professional comes in. They can help debunk the headlines so you can really understand today's market and what it means for you.

Here are three common housing market myths you might be hearing, along with the expert analysis that provides better context.

Myth 1: Home Prices Are Going To Fall

One piece of fiction many buyers may have seen or heard is that home prices are going to crash. That's because headlines often use similar but different terms to describe what's happening with prices. A few you might be seeing right now include:

  • Appreciation, or an increase in home prices.
  • Depreciation, or a decrease in home prices.
  • And deceleration, which is an increase in home prices, but at a slower pace.

The fact is, experts aren't calling for a decrease in prices. Instead, they forecast appreciation will continue, just at a decelerated pace. That means home prices will continue rising and won't fall. Selma Hepp, Deputy Chief Economist at CoreLogic, explains:

". . . higher mortgage rates coupled with more inventory will lead to slower home price growth but unlikely declines in home prices."

Myth 2: The Housing Market Is in a Correction

Another common myth is that the housing market is in a correction. Again, that's not the case. Here's why. According to Forbes:

"A correction is a sustained decline in the value of a market index or the price of an individual asset. A correction is generally agreed to be a 10% to 20% drop in value from a recent peak."

As mentioned above, home prices are still appreciating, and experts project that will continue, just at a slower pace. That means the housing market isn't in a correction because prices aren't falling. It's just moderating compared to the last two years, which were record-breaking in nearly every way.

Myth 3: The Housing Market Is Going To Crash

Some headlines are generating worry that the housing market is a bubble ready to burst. But experts say today is nothing like 2008. One of the reasons why is because lending standards are very different today. Logan Mohtashami, Lead Analyst for HousingWire, explains:

"As recession talk becomes more prevalent, some people are concerned that mortgage credit lending will get much tighter. This typically happens in a recession; however, the notion that credit lending in America will collapse as it did from 2005 to 2008 couldn't be more incorrect, as we haven't had a credit boom in the period between 2008-2022."

During the last housing bubble, it was much easier to get a mortgage than it is today. Since then, lending standards have tightened significantly, and purchasers who acquired a mortgage over the last decade are much more qualified than they were in the years leading up to the crash.

No matter what you're hearing about the housing market, let's connect. That way, you'll have a knowledgeable authority on your side that knows the ins and outs of the market, including current trends, historical context, and so much more. Contact Gambino Realtors to get started. 815.282.2222.

 

August
8

Defining the American dream is personal, and no one individual will have the same definition as another. But the feelings it brings about – success, freedom, and a sense of prosperity – are universal. That's why, for many people, homeownership remains a key part of the American dream. Your home is your stake in the community, a strong financial investment, and an achievement to be proud of.

A recent survey from Bankrate asked respondents to rank achievements as indicators of financial success, and the responses prove that owning a home is still important to so many Americans today (see graph below):

As the graph shows, homeownership ranks above other significant milestones, including retirement, having a successful career, and earning a college degree.

That could be because owning a home is a significant wealth-building tool and provides meaningful financial stability. The National Association of Realtors (NAR) explains:

"Homeownership builds financial security. With 65.5% of Americans owning homes, the net worth of a typical homeowner is nearly 40 times the net worth of a non-owner."

There are other ways your home acts as more than just a roof over your head, too. The Mortgage Reports highlights a few of the many benefits homeowners enjoy, including:

Plus, homeowners tend to be more active in their community. Like NAR says:

"Living in one place for a longer amount of time creates and [sic] obvious sense of community pride, which may lead to more investment in said community."

What Does That Mean for You?

If your definition of the American Dream involves greater freedom and prosperity, then homeownership could play a major role in helping you achieve that dream. When you set out to buy, know there are incredible benefits waiting for you at the end of your journey. You'll have a place you can call your own, feel most comfortable, and grow your wealth.

First American puts it best, saying:

"Homeownership remains central to the pursuit of the American Dream. It is a critical driver of economic mobility, delivering financial and social advantages. . . ."

Buying a home is a powerful decision and a key part of the American Dream. And if homeownership is part of your personal dreams this year, let's connect and start the process today. Call Gambino Realtors at 815.282.2222.

 

August
1

If you're following along with the news today, you've heard about rising inflation. Today, inflation is at a 40-year high. According to the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB):

"Consumer prices accelerated again in May as shelter, energy and food prices continued to surge at the fastest pace in decades. This marked the third straight month for inflation above an 8% rate and was the largest year-over-year gain since December 1981."

With inflation rising, you're likely feeling it impact your day-to-day life as prices go up for gas, groceries, and more. These climbing consumer costs can put a pinch on your wallet and make you re-evaluate any big purchases you have planned to ensure they're still worthwhile.

If you've been thinking about purchasing a home this year, you're probably wondering if you should continue down that path or if it makes more sense to wait. While the answer depends on your situation, here's how homeownership can help you combat the rising costs that come with inflation.

Homeownership Helps You Stabilize One of Your Biggest Monthly Expenses

Investopedia explains that during a period of high inflation, prices rise across the board. That's true for things like food, entertainment, and other goods and services, even housing. Both rental prices and home prices are on the rise. So, as a buyer, how can you protect yourself from increasing costs? The answer lies in homeownership.

Buying a home allows you to stabilize what's typically your biggest monthly expense: your housing cost. When you have a fixed-rate mortgage on your home, you lock in your monthly payment for the duration of your loan, often 15 to 30 years. James Royal, Senior Wealth Management Reporter at Bankratesays:

"A fixed-rate mortgage allows you to maintain the biggest portion of housing expenses at the same payment. Sure, property taxes will rise and other expenses may creep up, but your monthly housing payment remains the same. That's certainly not the case if you're renting."

So even if other prices increase, your housing payment will be a reliable amount that can help keep your budget in check. If you rent, you don't have that same benefit, and you won't be protected from rising housing costs.

Investing in an Asset That Historically Outperforms Inflation

While it's true rising home prices and higher mortgage rates mean that buying a house today costs more than it did even a few months ago, you still have an opportunity to set yourself up for a long-term win. That's because, in inflationary times, you want to be invested in an asset that outperforms inflation and typically holds or grows in value.

The graph below shows how the average home price appreciation outperformed the average inflation rate in most decades going all the way back to the seventies – making homeownership a historically strong hedge against inflation (see graph below):

So, what does that mean for you? Today, experts forecast home prices will only go up from here thanks to the ongoing imbalance of supply and demand. Once you buy a house, any home price appreciation that does occur will grow your equity and your net worth. And since homes are typically assets that grow in value, you have peace of mind that history shows your investment is a strong one.

That means, if you're ready and able, it makes sense to buy today before prices rise further.

If you've been thinking about buying a home this year, it makes sense to act soon, even with inflation rising. That way you can stabilize your monthly housing cost and invest in an asset that historically outperforms inflation. If you're ready to get started, let's connect so you have expert advice on your specific situation when you're ready to buy a home.